Requirements for the MA in International Affairs (one-year)

The one-year MA in International Affairs program is a two semester program*, with an additional part-time semester for the research project, comprised of 38 credits. The program is composed of five courses (20 credits), plus five required modules (8 credits), which are short, workshop style seminars taught by visiting professionals. The final 8 credits are fulfilled with a required research methods seminar (2 credits) and a 12,000-word thesis (6 credits).

* Classes for this program are not offered during the summer. Students starting the program in the spring semester will complete the program at the end of the following spring semester (May). Please contact graduate admissions for further details.

Core courses (8 credits)

Choose two of the following courses:

PO5005 Philo. Found. Of Internat'l Relations

Articulated within the emergence of the European nation-state and born in the context of the First World War and its aftermath, the discursive field of International Relations is organized around the constitutive concepts of conflict, anarchy, power, system, rule, law, and justice, and the practices of civil society and political economy. These concepts and practices organize, in turn, both the major schools of International Relations theory and contemporary methodological pluralism. This course interrogates these founding concepts from a philosophical perspective within the historical and discursive context of each major school: 1) from classical liberalism to international liberalism; 2) from classical realism to modern realism; 3) the ‘English School’ of IR theory (Bull); 4) Marxist tenets within international relations (from Karl Marx to international political economy); 5) Modern and Contemporary Critical Liberalism (Polanyi and Held); 6) The philosophical grounds of contemporary Constructivism.

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PO5012 Civil Society: Internat'l & Comp. Persp.

“Civil society” is one of the more elusive entries in the social science lexicon, and not a few have argued that we could do well without it. In a critical but appreciative spirit, this seminar introduces to the various meanings and uses that have been attributed to, or made of, civil society across time and national contexts. A constant in its various meanings is the reference to an elementary capacity of social self-organization beyond states and markets. This has made civil society an attractive alternative to diminished states and unfettered markets in the era of globalization, interestingly for the political left and right alike.

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PO5058 Conflict Manag't, Prevent'n, & Resolut'n

Course will examine both the theory and practice of decision making, diplomacy and conflict resolution. It will examine theories of procedural and instrumental rationality, prospect theory, multiple advocacy, along with an examination of actual policy formation involving bureaucratic politics, policy networks, and caucuses. The course will likewise examine diplomatic theories ranging from “ripe for resolution” to “ripe for prevention”. And finally, specific historical and contemporary cases studies involving conflict prevention, conflict management, conflict transformation and conflict resolution will be examined.

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PO5072 Us & World Affairs

America's predominant position in the modern world system derives from a continuous process of expansion. Using a pluridisciplinary approach with a strong historical focus, this course critically explores the US’s ascending movement from the confines to the center of the world system and the ways in which America has shaped the global political economy. It will allow students to anchor controversial contemporary debates (imperialism and hegemony, cooperation and conflict, multilateralism and unilateralism, globalization, transnationality and the nation state, etc.) in historic and comparative perspective. Major IR and IPE theoretical frameworks (realism, liberalism, Marxism, transnational theories) will be discussed and their relevance assessed when applied to different issue areas.

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Elective courses (12 credits)

Choose three courses from the PO, GV and LW course offerings.

Modules (10 credits)

Five modules (as available - module topics change from semester to semester):

PO5002 Modules

The module topics change each semester and are taught by working professionals in the fields of international affairs, conflict resolution and civil society development. Each semester four or more different modules are offered.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

Seminar and Thesis (8 credits)

PO5099 Thesis Methodology Seminar

This seminar is required for all students in their final semester of classes in the MAIA program. It is designed to instruct them in the appropriate methodology for the actual writing of the thesis. During the course of the semester students will be personally guided as they choose their thesis topic and will create an outline and abstract in preparation for their research and/or fieldwork.

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PO5095 Thesis

In the last semester of their studies students are required to complete a 20,000 word thesis. Additional paperwork available in the office of the Registrar is MANDATORY for registration of the thesis.

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* A special note:  U.S. Federal regulations state that AUP students receiving federal loans cannot do research or write up their thesis while physically present in the United States.

 

Timeline

1ST SEMESTER 2ND SEMESTER 3RD SEMESTER
1 core course+ 2 electives 1 core course + 1 elective Thesis
2 modules 3 modules
1 Thesis Methodology Seminar
16 credits 16 credits 6 credits

 

Requirements for the MA in International Affairs (part-time, two-year)

The MA in International Affairs program can be done part-time over four semesters with an additional semester for the research project. The program is composed of five courses (20 credits), plus five required modules (10 credits), which are short, workshop style seminars taught by visiting professionals. The final 8 credits are fulfilled with a required research methods seminar (2 credits) and a 12,000-word thesis (6 credits).

Core courses (8 credits)

Choose two of the following courses:

PO5005 Philo. Found. Of Internat'l Relations

Articulated within the emergence of the European nation-state and born in the context of the First World War and its aftermath, the discursive field of International Relations is organized around the constitutive concepts of conflict, anarchy, power, system, rule, law, and justice, and the practices of civil society and political economy. These concepts and practices organize, in turn, both the major schools of International Relations theory and contemporary methodological pluralism. This course interrogates these founding concepts from a philosophical perspective within the historical and discursive context of each major school: 1) from classical liberalism to international liberalism; 2) from classical realism to modern realism; 3) the ‘English School’ of IR theory (Bull); 4) Marxist tenets within international relations (from Karl Marx to international political economy); 5) Modern and Contemporary Critical Liberalism (Polanyi and Held); 6) The philosophical grounds of contemporary Constructivism.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

PO5012 Civil Society: Internat'l & Comp. Persp.

“Civil society” is one of the more elusive entries in the social science lexicon, and not a few have argued that we could do well without it. In a critical but appreciative spirit, this seminar introduces to the various meanings and uses that have been attributed to, or made of, civil society across time and national contexts. A constant in its various meanings is the reference to an elementary capacity of social self-organization beyond states and markets. This has made civil society an attractive alternative to diminished states and unfettered markets in the era of globalization, interestingly for the political left and right alike.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

PO5058 Conflict Manag't, Prevent'n, & Resolut'n

Course will examine both the theory and practice of decision making, diplomacy and conflict resolution. It will examine theories of procedural and instrumental rationality, prospect theory, multiple advocacy, along with an examination of actual policy formation involving bureaucratic politics, policy networks, and caucuses. The course will likewise examine diplomatic theories ranging from “ripe for resolution” to “ripe for prevention”. And finally, specific historical and contemporary cases studies involving conflict prevention, conflict management, conflict transformation and conflict resolution will be examined.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

PO5072 Us & World Affairs

America's predominant position in the modern world system derives from a continuous process of expansion. Using a pluridisciplinary approach with a strong historical focus, this course critically explores the US’s ascending movement from the confines to the center of the world system and the ways in which America has shaped the global political economy. It will allow students to anchor controversial contemporary debates (imperialism and hegemony, cooperation and conflict, multilateralism and unilateralism, globalization, transnationality and the nation state, etc.) in historic and comparative perspective. Major IR and IPE theoretical frameworks (realism, liberalism, Marxism, transnational theories) will be discussed and their relevance assessed when applied to different issue areas.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

Elective courses (12 credits)

Choose three of the following courses:

PO5025 Communication & The Global Public Sphere

This course focuses on the concept of the/a public. Discusses how media and political actors rhetorically constitute the public; how they (and occasionally governments) constitute “public spaces”(virtual and material) in which public discourse takes place, and how institutional and technological forces constitute “public opinion” and articulate “the public interest.” On the other hand, we will consider how political economy of media and social practices facilitate or stifle spaces, political actors, and publics. The course will also compare contemporary manifestations of public-making with Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, which he thought was an area of social life vital to a legitimate democracy. The potentiality, control, and use of new communication technologies are explored in relation to the existence and future of a global public sphere.

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PO5026 Politics & Economics Of Global Media

This course examines the dynamics of the global media system. Students will gain a critical awareness of how international flows of information, entertainment and lifestyle values play a powerful role in shaping cultural and political realities. The concept of "soft power" is key in examining the influence of Western pop culture, whether as "imperialism" or as "globalization". The course examines soft power in various forms: Hollywood movies, television series, pop music, Disney cartoons, fast food such as Coca-Cola and McDonalds, and social media networks such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. The course also analyzes the influence of non-Anglo-American pop culture — from Turkish soap operas to Latin American "telenovelas".

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CM/GV5050

PO/GV5062

PO5079 Media, Governance & Diversity

This course takes up the life of multiculturalism, cultural diversity and pluralism as organizing principles for social relations between the state, communications media and populations. The course is divided into three parts: The first part of the course offers an introduction to different conceptions of society and their relationship to understandings of identity and difference. We will also take a brief look at the relationship between culture and governance, paying specific attention to the issues associated with cultural policy. The second part of the course will engage with the relationship between media, governance and diversity as framed within the context of the contemporary nation-state. The third part of the course looks at a few international and transnational institutions and issues, raising questions about the possible futures of difference and diversity.

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LW5000 International Public Law

This foundational course introduces the student to the nature, major principles, processes and institutions of the international legal system, the relationship between international and domestic law and the role of law in promoting world public order. Students will acquire an understanding of the conceptual issues underlying this discipline and a critical appreciation of how law interacts with contemporary world politics. Topics include the creation and status of international law, participation and competence in the international legal system, primary substantive norms such as the law regulating the use of force and enforcement procedures.

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LW5020 Comparative Law

This course covers the world’s wide-range of legal systems; offers comparative evaluation of the merits of differing legal solutions to social problems; and explores many of the current attempts to unify common and civil law at the international level. Special attention is given to the prominent features of civil law and common law systems, such as the rule of precedent (common law) versus the reliance on good faith (civil law), or the investigatory civil procedure (civil law) and the adversarial civil procedure (common law). Selected civil law judgments and common law judgments will be compared.

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LW5025 International Environmental Law

This course is concerned with the international legal response to environmental problems. In addition to comparative environmental law, major multinational treaties (and their enforcement regimes) addressing global environmental problems, the course will also address issues concerning the "conflict" between international trade and international and domestic environmental and natural resource protection.

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LW/CM5046

GV/PO5033

GV/PO5035

GV5036

GV5067

GV/PO5076

PO5030 Politics & Policy I

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts, methodologies, and empirical studies in comparative politics. As a subfield of political science, comparative politics is generally understood as the study of political processes and structures of all possible kinds from the vantage point of international comparison, sometimes for the mere fact of covering a country or region other than one’s own (so-called “area studies”). A few substantive themes that have traditionally preoccupied political comparativists: development, democratization, regime change, etc. will be addressed in the introductory part of this course. The second part is on the origins, development, and functions of the modern state, forms of interest representation and state-society relations, and on how different political regime forms condition different political and policy-making dynamics. In the third part we review some key contemporary challenges to political systems around the world: the “constitutionalization” of politics, globalization, regionalization, and transnationalization.

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PO5073 Media & Society In The Middle East & N.afr.

This course examines the role of Media in the Middle East and North Africa (primarily Arab countries). It analyzes the different ways in which Media and politics intersect. It covers the evolution of the Middle Eastern Mediascape, its relation to ideologies, to political and intellectual circles, to the emerging ruling elites, to entertainment and to financial sponsors. The course discusses as well the emergence of Pan Arab Media outlets (from newspapers to Satellite channels), their impact on the regional media scene, and then the beginning of the digital era or the "democratization" of media with internet, social networks, smart phones, and their roles in revolutions. Islam, its perceptions, its political impact, and the way some Islamist movements deal with or use the Media are topics to explore. LEARNING OUTCOMES: 1. To provide students with an understanding of important media trends in the Middle East. 2. To help students reflect on the role of Media in Middle Eastern culture and politics. 3. To assist students think through the roles that traditional and new/digital Media have played in revolutions in the region

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Modules (10 credits)

Five modules (as available - module topics change from semester to semester):

PO5002 Modules

The module topics change each semester and are taught by working professionals in the fields of international affairs, conflict resolution and civil society development. Each semester four or more different modules are offered.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

Seminar and Thesis (8 credits)

PO5099 Thesis Methodology Seminar

This seminar is required for all students in their final semester of classes in the MAIA program. It is designed to instruct them in the appropriate methodology for the actual writing of the thesis. During the course of the semester students will be personally guided as they choose their thesis topic and will create an outline and abstract in preparation for their research and/or fieldwork.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

PO5095 Thesis

In the last semester of their studies students are required to complete a 20,000 word thesis. Additional paperwork available in the office of the Registrar is MANDATORY for registration of the thesis.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

Timeline

1ST SEMESTER 2ND SEMESTER 3RD SEMESTER 4TH SEMESTER Summer
1 core course 1 core course  2 elective courses 1 elective course Thesis
2 modules 2 modules 1 module
1 Thesis Methodology Seminar
8 credits 8 credits 8 credits 8 credits 8 credits