The ability to make comparisons across cultures and time periods is a critical interpretive skill for citizens of the twenty-first century. It helps us articulate similarities and differences and gives us insight into how people think and live—with all the moral, ethical, and ideological forces at play. 

The courses encourage you to compare worlds past and present in an effort to promote historical and cross-cultural understanding. The humanities—be it history, literature, philosophy, languages, religion, or art—help us to make sense of the world. As the root of the very word suggests, the humanities explore what it means to be human. 

Requirements: 

  • Four credits (one course) from the Mapping the World rubric 

  • Four credits (one course) from the Comparing Worlds rubric 

  • Four credits (one course) from either 

 

Courses

AH1000 Intro To Western Art I

Teaches the skills needed for an informed approach to art and architecture by introducing the salient concepts, techniques, and developments of Western Art. Studies works from ancient Greece, Rome, and the European Middle Ages in their K19 historical, social, and cultural contexts. Includes visits to museums and monuments in and around Paris.

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AH1003 Intro To Art Through Paris Museums

Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch. The course has an extra course fee of 35 euros.

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AH1020 Intro To Western Art II

Continues the study of the most significant monuments of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums.

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AH2000 Paris Through Its Architecture I

Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times through the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

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AH2011 Ancient Art & Architecture

Introduces first the specific contributions of Greek art to the Western tradition. Then presents the diversification of these achievements in the Etruscan civilization and in the Hellenistic age. Examines how the Romans absorbed, continued, and creatively transformed Greek and Etruscan art and passed the ancient heritage on to medieval and early modern Europe. AH 1000 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

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AH2012 Medieval Art & Architecture

Explores the adaptation of ancient art by the Christian religious establishment and the interaction of early medieval artists with the Graeco-Roman tradition. Follows the development of medieval art in the West to the Gothic period by analyzing its spiritual dimensions and diversity as well as the impact on artistic creation of the changing centers of power and influences. AH 1000 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

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AH2013 Renaissance Art & Architecture

Surveys notable developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy and in Northern Europe (late 13th-16th centuries). Emphasizes the origins of the Renaissance and the basic stylistic evolution from Early to High Renaissance and Mannerism. Explores the ramifications of the Italian Renaissance mode as it came into contact with other historical and cultural traditions in Northern Europe. AH 1000 and AH 1020 are strongly recommended as prerequisites.

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AH2014 Baroque & Rococo Art & Architecture

Examines the dynamic and often militant Baroque style in Counter-Reformation Italy and its national variants in France, Spain, and Flanders. Traces the development of new and different modes of expression in the emerging Protestant Netherlands. Explores the evolution from Baroque to Rococo as well as the arts of the 18th-Century in France and England. AH 1020 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

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AH2016 19th & 20th Cent. Art & Architecture

Introduces the principal arts and aesthetic issues of the 19th and 20th centuries from the French Revolution to World War II. Studies artists such as David, Turner, Monet, and Picasso, as well as movements such as Romanticism, Impressionism, and Surrealism, stressing continuities beneath apparent differences of approach. Regular museum sessions at the Louvre, the Musee d'Orsay, and the Centre Pompidou. AH 1020 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

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AH3074 Philosophy Of Aesthetics

What is Art? What is Beauty? How can I know what is beautiful? And what does it mean to me? These are some of Aesthetics’ main questions as it is the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and value of art and the criteria of artistic judgment and experience. Various answers have been given throughout the history of philosophy, from Plato and Aristotle to Kant and today’s analytical or postmodern philosophy, making of aesthetics a vibrant and dynamic discipline, constantly revitalised by new art forms and critical concepts. Through a thorough historical survey of the notion students learn to discuss art and beauty in a time when these classical notions are undergoing very important changes. Everyone is encouraged to bring in his or her own experience of art. Due to its cross listing with PL 3074, this 3000 level Art History does not have a pre-requisite in Art History

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CL1025 The World, The Text, & The Critic I

Considers closely three moments when the practice of writing changed radically in response to historical and cultural processes, from Ancient Greece to 1800 (specific contents change each year). Investigates the forces that inform creative imagination and cultural production. Places those moments and those forces within a geographical and historical map of literary production, and introduces the tools of literary analysis.

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CL1050 The World, The Text, And The Critic II

This team-taught course opens up a historical panorama of European literature stretching from the 18th to the 21st century. It does not pretend to provide a survey of this period but rather showcases a selection of significant moments and locations when literary genres changed or new genres appeared. The idea is to open as many doors as possible onto the rich complexity of comparative literary history. In order to help students orient themselves within various histories of generic mutations and emergences, the professors have put together a vocabulary of key literary critical terms in the fields of narrative structure, style, and rhetoric.

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CL1091 Freshmen Topics

A series of topic-centered courses, introducing themes in Comparative Literature.

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CL2010 Paris Through Its Books

Examines how experiences of Paris have been committed to the page from the first century to the present. Considers the uses and effects of overviews, street-level accounts, and underground approaches to describing the city and its inhabitants. Includes visits to the sewers and museums, revolutionary sites and archives, with multiple members of the comparative literature faculty speaking on their areas of expertise. http://www.aup.edu/paris-through-its-books

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CL2051 English Literature Before 1800

Begins with Old English literary texts, then examines selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the conventions of Middle English drama and lyrics, earlier Renaissance styles of lyric poetry (Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney), and then Shakespeare's sonnets and a major Shakespeare play. Reviews the dominant styles of Metaphysical and Cavalier poetry (Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Crashaw, Suckling, Waller, Milton).

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CL2052 English Literature Since 1800

From the Romantic period, covers major examples of: prose - the transition from the 19th century models to Modernist experimentation; poetry - the development of modern poetic form and the fortunes of European hermetic influence in an increasingly politicized century; and drama - examples of absurdist and left-wing drama which have dominated the British stage since the 1950s.

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CL2054 Modern Latin American & Spanish Lit.

Traces modern continental and Latin American literature from the Molieresque comedy of Moratin to the magical realism of Garcia Marquez. Readings include Spanish authors (fiction by Galdos, Unamuno, Cela, Goytisolo), Spanish-American writers (poetry of Neruda, Paz and tales by Borges, Rulfo), and one Brazilian writer (Clarice Lispector). Conducted in English. Written work accepted in English or Spanish.

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CL2059 Tales From Europe Central

The end of the Cold War raised numerous questions concerning the boundaries of what had once been known as Mitteleuropa—a large swath of territory at the geographic heart of Europe, much of which belonged to the multi-ethnic Habsburg Empire before World War I. For writers like Milan Kundera, “Eastern Europe” was a misnomer when used to refer to nations such as Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland, whose cultural heritage, during previous centuries, had been intimately bound to that of their western neighbors. In this course, we explore how the shared cultural legacy of this extraordinarily diverse region—diverse in its ethnicities, religions and languages—manifests in its literature. Topics discussed include history, black humor, music, irony, sexuality, the rise of ethnic nationalism, the fate of the region’s Jews, and the legacies of both the Holocaust and Soviet control. We also consider the dissemination of modernity in "peripheral" cities such as Warsaw, Budapest or Zurich. A study trip to Vienna includes visits to legendary cafes, museums, and concert halls. This course may additionally feature guest appearances by authors and translators (in person or by Skype), as well as cinematic representations of themes explored in assigned texts.

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CL2094 French Fiction Now: Traduire Le Roman Francais Contemp.

Ce cours introduira les étudiants aux techniques et aux problématiques de la traduction littéraire par le cas particulier des traductions en anglais de romans contemporains écrits en français. La traduction sera discutée comme un transfert culturel : en observant comment des écrivains représentatifs (Houellebecq, Djebar, Gavalda…) ont été reçus aux USA, et en GB, et en faisant le commentaire de trois traductions récentes. L’essentiel du cours sera consacré à l’expérience collective et individuelle de la traduction d’un livre non encore traduit.

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CL3017 Greek & Roman Key Texts

In-depth study of Ancient Greek and Latin texts or authors of both literary and philosophical interest. Subjects may include, e.g., the comparison of a Greek and a Roman philosopher; close reading of the oeuvre, or part of an oeuvre, of one author; the literary and philosophical analysis of a collection of thematically and generically connected passages “For the course description, please find this course in the respective semester on the public course browser: https://www.aup.edu/academics/course-catalog/by-term.”

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CL3025 Dante & Medieval Culture

Offers a detailed investigation of The Divine Comedy. Traces Dante's development in several related areas (love, mysticism, allegory, poetics, politics) and his affinity with other key cultural figures (Virgil, St. Augustine, St. Bernard, St. Thomas, Boccaccio). Includes an overview of medieval history.

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CL3035 Contemporary World Literature

This course offers close engagement with recently translated fiction and poetry from around the globe. In addition to reading great contemporary writing, students are introduced to today’s new media landscape, which has taken on an increasingly important role in the promotion and evaluation of global literature. Units on the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe.

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CL3043 Paris Attraction: Modernist Experiments In Migration

Explores the work of Anglo-American modernist writers in Paris, concentrating on the works of Ernest Hemingway, Wyndham Lewis, Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, Jean Rhys, and other writers. Relates their formal experimentation to the visual arts and to the psychic dynamics of exile: the experience of liberation from the constraints of one culture and an alienated relation to the new environment.

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CL3050 Intermediate Latin II

This course builds on the skills acquired in Intermediate Latin I. You read longer, more difficult texts and train basic methods of classical philology and literary criticism, e.g., metrical and stylistic analysis, textual criticism, use of scholarly commentaries and dictionaries, recognizing levels of style and characteristic generic features.

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CL3063 Kafka And World Literature

Kafka’s work has left indelible traces in the pages of today’s most important novelists, in the West and beyond. In this course we consider the meaning – and when relevant, the burden – of his global legacy. Assigned readings include “The Metamorphosis”, The Trial and other seminal works by Kafka alongside an assortment of Kafka-inflected fictions from around the world.

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CL3070 Intermediate Ancient Greek II

This course builds on the skills acquired in Intermediate Ancient Greek I. Students read longer, more difficult texts and train basic methods of classical philology and literary criticism, e.g., metrical and stylistic analysis, textual criticism, use of scholarly commentaries and dictionaries, recognizing levels of style and characteristic generic features.

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CL4050 Advanced Study In Latin

Advanced study in Latin according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Latin author, genre, or period; Latin prose composition; study of Latin meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Latin drama in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).

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CL4070 Advanced Study In Ancient Greek

Advanced study in ancient Greek according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Greek author, genre, or period; Greek prose composition; Greek dialects; study of Greek meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Greek tragedy in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).

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CM2004 Comparative Communications History

This course provides historical background to understand how contemporary communication practices and technologies have developed and are in the process of developing and reflects on what communication has been in different human societies across time and place. It considers oral and literate cultures, the development of writing systems, of printing, and different cultural values assigned to the image. The parallel rise of mass media and modern western cultural and political forms and the manipulation and interplay of the properties and qualities conveyed by speech, sight, and sound are studied with reference to the printed book, newspapers, photography, radio, cinema, television, new media.

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EN2051 English Literature Before 1800

Begins with Old English literary texts, then examines selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the conventions of Middle English drama and lyrics, earlier Renaissance styles of lyric poetry (Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney), and then Shakespeare's sonnets and a major Shakespeare play. Reviews the dominant styles of Metaphysical and Cavalier poetry (Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Crashaw, Suckling, Waller, Milton).

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EN2052 English Literature Since 1800

From the Romantic period, covers major examples of: prose - the transition from the 19th century models to Modernist experimentation; poetry - the development of modern poetic form and the fortunes of European hermetic influence in an increasingly politicized century; and drama - examples of absurdist and left-wing drama which have dominated the British stage since the 1950s.

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ES1010 The Modern City

Studies the foundations of the 19th-and 20th-century city, examining the cultural dynamics of key European cities. Uses film and other texts to question and explore urban modernity.

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ES2010 Early Islamic History

This course offers an introduction to the first century and a half of Islamic society, 600-700 AD. It builds on knowledge of ways of writing about the past which students have acquired in earlier courses. The focus of the course is the rise and development of the religion of Islam and the key events and figures in the process. They will read extracts by those who wrote history in the early Islamic centuries – and those who have approached early Islam and is history in the global North, notably since he nineteenth century. Essentially, the course offers: - Substantive detail about the rise of the last of the Abrahamic monotheism; - Theoretical reflection on the interplay between mediated communication, history and organized religion; - An exploration of the history writing practices of early Muslims; - An introduction of the intellectual history of nineteenth and twentieth century historiographies of the early Islamic Middle East and North Africa; - An introduction to pilgrimage practices in Islam.

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ES3002 Berlin From Allied Occupation To Capital

Examines the Allied partition of Berlin, the politics of the Cold War, the Berlin Air Lift, the emergence of two German states, the division by the Berlin Wall, and the reemergence of a unified city in a new Germany. Films, drama, and novels trace the historical development of the city. Includes a study trip to Berlin.

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ES3017 The Islamic City

Surveys the history of urban form in the predominantly Muslim cities of the Middle East and North Africa. Students will study the relationship between urban morphology and society, practices of sacred space, and the interplay of power, belief, and architectural form. Also covered are the politics behind the forms now seen as the defining features of Islamic building and the question of the image in Islamic building. On a contemporary note, students will explore the symbolic politics of the Muslim built heritage and examine the extreme conditions facing many Middle Eastern urban populations today. Includes a Study Trip. Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

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ES3025 Dante & Medieval Culture

Offers a detailed investigation of The Divine Comedy. Traces Dante's development in several related areas (love, mysticism, allegory, poetics, politics) and his affinity with other key cultural figures (Virgil, St. Augustine, St. Bernard, St. Thomas, Boccaccio). Includes an overview of medieval history.

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ES3043 Paris Attraction: Modernist Experiments In Migration

Explores the work of Anglo-American modernist writers in Paris, concentrating on the works of Ernest Hemingway, Wyndham Lewis, Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, Jean Rhys, and other writers. Relates their formal experimentation to the visual arts and to the psychic dynamics of exile: the experience of liberation from the constraints of one culture and an alienated relation to the new environment.

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FM1010 Films & Their Meanings

Students begin with an analysis of basic elements of film language (signs, codes, syntax). They study the technology, economics and politics of the film industry as it has developed in the United States and Europe. In the latter half of the course they will investigate the impact of television, video, computers and digital media in the history of cinema.

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FM2075 Intro To History Of Narrative Film I

Studies film history, aesthetics, and techniques of film analysis. Illustrates the basic theories of film-making with specific films of important directors such as Griffith, Eisenstein, Stroheim, Chaplin, Keaton, Murnau, Sternberg, Lubitsch, Renoir, Hawks, Ford, Welles, and Sturges.

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FM2090 Film Noir

Studies America's cinematic myth: Film Noir, a pessimistic style appearing in Hollywood in the 1940s. Films include: The Maltese Falcon, Shadow of a Doubt, The Big Sleep, Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Touch of Evil, Out of the Past, The Woman in the Window, Murder My Sweet, Force of Evil, Pickup on South Street, and Kiss Me Deadly.

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FM3076 Arab Cinema

An exploration of the Arabic-language film as entertainment, narrative and cultural event in the Arab Middle East and North Africa. Themes include cinema in the Arabophone socio-cultural context and film-producing institutions in national and pan-Arab culture. The final project is based on either visual analysis of an Arab film or an aspect of the politics of film making in the Middle East.

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FM3087 Paris Cinema

Studies the numerous facets, whether real or imaginary, of the close relationship between Paris and cinema. Analyzes films made by famous directors such as Clair, Carne, Godard, Malle, Rohmer, Polanski, Collard, Kassovitz, and others. Taught in French, essays and exams can be written/ taken in English.

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FR2094 French Fiction Now: Traduire Le Roman Francais Contemp.

Ce cours introduira les étudiants aux techniques et aux problématiques de la traduction littéraire par le cas particulier des traductions en anglais de romans contemporains écrits en français. La traduction sera discutée comme un transfert culturel : en observant comment des écrivains représentatifs (Houellebecq, Djebar, Gavalda…) ont été reçus aux USA, et en GB, et en faisant le commentaire de trois traductions récentes. L’essentiel du cours sera consacré à l’expérience collective et individuelle de la traduction d’un livre non encore traduit.

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FR3087 Paris Cinema

Studies the numerous facets, whether real or imaginary, of the close relationship between Paris and cinema. Analyzes films made by famous directors such as Clair, Carne, Godard, Malle, Rohmer, Polanski, Collard, Kassovitz, and others. Taught in French, essays and exams can be written / taken in English.

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FR3090 Topics In French & History (sorbonne)

A limited number of students with requisite oral and written competence in French may follow one course at the Universite de Paris IV - Sorbonne. Every semester, a different selection of courses will be proposed from the Sorbonne's History department, generally on a subject of the cultural and social history of Europe. Students who are selected for participation attend amphitheater lectures and classroom meetings (travaux diriges) at the Sorbonne, and also classroom meetings at AUP through the semester with a designated faculty member. Tests, exams, oral presentations and papers are assigned both at the Sorbonne and at AUP. The course grade and credits are given as for an AUP course. Information on this cooperative program is available from Professor Miranda Spieler.

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FR3091 Topics (sorbonne)

A limited number of students with requisite oral and written competence in French may follow one course at the Universite de Paris IV - Sorbonne. Every semester, a different selection of courses will be proposed from the Sorbonne's History department, generally on a subject of the cultural and social history of Europe. Students who are selected for participation attend amphitheater lectures and classroom meetings (travaux diriges) at the Sorbonne, and also classroom meetings at AUP through the semester with a designated faculty member. Tests, exams, oral presentations and papers are assigned both at the Sorbonne and at AUP. The course grade and credits are given as for an AUP course. Information on this cooperative program is available from Pr Miranda Spieler.

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GK1005 Elementary Ancient Greek I

This is a course for beginners. By reading simple ancient Greek texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Greek yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Greek for students of philosophy, is possible.

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GK4070 Advanced Study In Ancient Greek

Advanced study in ancient Greek according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Greek author, genre, or period; Greek prose composition; Greek dialects; study of Greek meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Greek tragedy in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).

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GS2016 Gender And Sexuality: Global Perspectives

Interrogates the concepts of ‘gender’ and ‘sexuality’ from a comparative, global perspective, drawing from multiple disciplines such as anthropology, ethnography, philosophy, sociology and history. Engages with questions of inequality, social justice and diversity as they are mapped onto gender and played out in institutional, political and socio-cultural power relations.

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GS3014 Art, Cult., & Gender In Ital. Renaissance

Gender in the Italian Renaissance Examines the art and culture of the Italian Renaissance from the ever-expanding modern perspectives of Gay and Women's studies. Studies the art of Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo and lesser-known artists, as well as Castiglione's Book of the Courtier, within the broad context of early modern history and in relation to contemporaneous sexual practices and gender roles. Includes Louvre visits.

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HI1000 Englishbridge: Los Angeles 1900-1950

Focuses on Los Angeles, golden city of cinema and myth, and more realistically, a multi-tiered transplanted society rife with internal tension. The course retraces some of the key phases of the development of the city, investigates how and the extent to which the myth of an “earthly paradise” was manufactured, and raises questions about the impact of the city's mythic status on its social fabric.

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HI1013 The City In World History

We have reached a critical moment in the evolution of cities. From Ur and Rome to Shanghai and the shadow cities of the 21st century, this radical shift in the way humans inhabit the planet marks a watershed moment in the history of world. This course will offer a historical perspective on this global transformation through an interdisciplinary study of city development from the ancient world to present. Students will be introduced to dominant themes of global and urban history by reading the historians, urban planners and social scientists who have traced the evolution of the built environment in context from its origins to today.

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HI2010 Early Islamic History

This course offers an introduction to the first century and a half of Islamic society, 600-700 AD. It builds on knowledge of ways of writing about the past which students have acquired in earlier courses. The focus of the course is the rise and development of the religion of Islam and the key events and figures in the process. They will read extracts by those who wrote history in the early Islamic centuries – and those who have approached early Islam and is history in the global North, notably since he nineteenth century. Essentially, the course offers: - Substantive detail about the rise of the last of the Abrahamic monotheism; - Theoretical reflection on the interplay between mediated communication, history and organized religion; - An exploration of the history writing practices of early Muslims; - An introduction of the intellectual history of nineteenth and twentieth century historiographies of the early Islamic Middle East and North Africa; - An introduction to pilgrimage practices in Islam.

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HI2020 The Historical Foundations Of Law

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical foundations of legal thought and to cultivate literacy in legal reasoning. The course provides an essential resource for our future global citizens by exploring key legal texts, histories and cases and familiarizing students with the historical origins of key contemporary legal issues.

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HI3002 Berlin From Allied Occupation To Capital

Examines the Allied partition of Berlin, the politics of the Cold War, the Berlin Air Lift, the emergence of two German states, the division by the Berlin Wall, and the reemergence of a unified city in a new Germany. Films, drama, and novels trace the historical development of the city. Includes a study trip to Berlin.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

HI3017 The Islamic City

Surveys the history of urban form in the predominantly Muslim cities of the Middle East and North Africa. Students will study the relationship between urban morphology and society, practices of sacred space, and the interplay of power, belief, and architectural form. Also covered are the politics behind the forms now seen as the defining features of Islamic building and the question of the image in Islamic building. On a contemporary note, students will explore the symbolic politics of the Muslim built heritage and examine the extreme conditions facing many Middle Eastern urban populations today. Includes a Study Trip. Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

SEE IN COURSE CATALOG >

HI3090 Topics In History (sorbonne)

A limited number of students with requisite oral and written competence in French may follow one course at the Universite de Paris IV - Sorbonne. Every semester, a different selection of courses will be proposed from the Sorbonne's History department, generally on a subject of the cultural and social history of Europe. Students who are selected for participation attend amphitheater lectures and classroom meetings (travaux diriges) at the Sorbonne, and also classroom meetings at AUP through the semester with a designated faculty member. Tests, exams, oral presentations and papers are assigned both at the Sorbonne and at AUP. The course grade and credits are given as for an AUP course. Information on this cooperative program is available from Professor Miranda Spieler.

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IDISC1091 Interdisciplinary Topics

Topics vary every semester.

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LI1000 Language Acq And Soc Policy

LT1001 Elementary Latin I

This is a Latin course for beginners. By reading simple Latin texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Latin yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic passive vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Medieval Latin, is possible.

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-
LT4050 Advanced Study In Latin

Advanced study in Latin according to the wishes of the student. This course can be taken several times with different projects. Some of the possible offers are: in-depth study of the work of a particular Latin author, genre, or period; Latin prose composition; study of Latin meter (including a public recitation); performance of a Latin drama in the original language (if a sufficient number of interested students can be found).

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PL1000 Belief, Knowledge, Facts

Introduces the skills and techniques appropriate to philosophy. Analyzes examples of philosophical reasoning as well as ordinary reasoning, to make clear the nature of argument and show what is specific to philosophy. Aims to equip students with essential tools for the understanding of contemporary debate.

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PL1100 History Of Philosophy I: Ancient & Medieval

Formerly PL2011. This course offers an overview of ancient and medieval philosophy. Beginning with the earliest Greek philosophers and ending with the late medieval founding fathers of modern scientific thought, we will read and discuss various answers these thinkers gave to questions such as: 'What is a good life?' or 'How can I reconcile my faith with what reason tells me?' Readings include Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Seneca, Plotinus, Anselm, Avicenna, Abelard, Maimonides, Thomas Aquinas and Nicolaus of Autrecourt.

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PL1200 History Of Philosophy II

Formerly PL2022. This course aims to provide a solid and comprehensive grounding in modern philosophy focusing on the main issues and theories of late Renaissance philosophy, modern Rationalism and Empiricism, philosophies of the Enlightenment, Critical philosophy, modern Idealism, Phenomenology and some questions of analytic philosophy. It offers an introduction to the works of the major figures of this tradition.

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PL2003 Political Philosophy

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

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PL2071 Critique Of Political Economy

The course focuses on the impact of the emergent discipline of political economy on modern philosophy. A brief overview of the work of Adam Smith and David Ricardo will introduce the concerns of political economy before the course focuses on Karl Marx's attempt to re-orientate philosophy through the critique of political economy.

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PL2072 Freud & Nietzsche

An introduction to one of the key orientations of modern philosophy: critical genealogy and its central problematic, the identity and formation of the subject. The aim of critical genealogy is to unearth the hidden and unsuspected mechanisms, whether institutional or familial, which lie behind the formation of individual and social identities.

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PL3007 Concepts In Relativity And Quantum Theories

The nature of reality changed in fundamental ways in the early part of the 20th century. Concepts of duration, length, sequential order, simultaneity, weight, energy, location, mass, substance and void became a matter of perspective or ‘reference frame’. Scientists had been trying to explain apparently ‘absurd’ results, such as Maxwell’s EM wave equations or the photovoltaic effect, within the framework of classical physics. Much like what Ptolemy did with Aristotle’s model of the dynamics of the heavens before Copernicus and Kepler got it right, or, at least, not so wrong. In this course, I will present the basic principles, and derive the implications, of the theory of Special Relativity, I will describe the concepts and equivalences underlying the theory of General Relativity and show you why we know them to be correct (or at least not very wrong), I will introduce quantum theory and the quantum model of the atom and explain why it is better than plum pudding (see J. J. Thomson’s 1904 “plum pudding” model for the atom). In this course, you will learn about time travel, e=mc², black holes and wormholes. Is it true that if you run straight towards a cement wall it is just possible that you will make it through to the other side unharmed? Yes.

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PL3017 Greek & Roman Key Texts

In-depth study of Ancient Greek and Latin texts or authors of both literary and philosophical interest. Subjects may include, e.g., the comparison of a Greek and a Roman philosopher; close reading of the oeuvre, or part of an oeuvre, of one author; the literary and philosophical analysis of a collection of thematically and generically connected passages “For the course description, please find this course in the respective semester on the public course browser: https://www.aup.edu/academics/course-catalog/by-term.”

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PL3074 Philosophy Of Aesthetics

What is Art? What is Beauty? How can I know what is beautiful? And what does it mean to me? These are some of Aesthetics’ main questions as it is the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and value of art and the criteria of artistic judgment and experience. Various answers have been given throughout the history of philosophy, from Plato and Aristotle to Kant and today’s analytical or postmodern philosophy, making of aesthetics a vibrant and dynamic discipline, constantly revitalised by new art forms and critical concepts. Through a thorough historical survey of the notion students learn to discuss art and beauty in a time when these classical notions are undergoing very important changes. Everyone is encouraged to bring in his or her own experience of art. There is no prerequisite for this course.

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PO2003 Political Philosophy

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

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PY3067 Social Memory

This course inquires into the nature and dynamics of how groups (families, institutions, countries, etc.) reconstruct and represent the past together. The problem of social memory is approached from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to explore various places of memory in Paris and examine how these historical events are constructed in the present.

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VC1091 Topics:visual Culture

VC3014 Art, Cult., & Gender In Ital. Renaissance

Gender in the Italian Renaissance Examines the art and culture of the Italian Renaissance from the ever-expanding modern perspectives of Gay and Women's studies. Studies the art of Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo and lesser-known artists, as well as Castiglione's Book of the Courtier, within the broad context of early modern history and in relation to contemporaneous sexual practices and gender roles. Includes Louvre visits.

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