At AUP, courses in Mapping the World correspond to the social sciences and help students understand how human experience has been organized in and across time and space—and how various forms of social experience emerged spatially and historically around the globe. 

Courses that fulfill the Mapping the World requirement are numerous and varied—everything from social anthropology to social robotics, intercultural communication to contemporary feminist theory. Just as cartography is the study of making maps, study in the social sciences helps you explore social experience and organization—and “map” the human world.

 

Courses

AN1002 Socio-cultural Anthropology

Sociocultural anthropology is the comparative study of human societies and cultures. This course is designed to introduce students to central areas of anthropological inquiry, a range of key theoretical perspectives and the discipline’s holistic approach. Through field-based research projects, students will also gain familiarity with the discipline’s qualitative research methods (especially participant observation). While students will encounter the works of key historical figures in the discipline, they will also discover current debates on globalization and transnationalism. Finally, this course also strives to cultivate students’ ability to reflect critically on their own identities and cultures, thereby gaining a greater understanding and appreciation for diversity and an improved set of intercultural communication skills.

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AN3061 Anthropology Of Cities

Presents an anthropological approach to the study of cities, providing students with theoretical and methodological tools to think critically about the meaning of urban life today. Approaches this topic from a cross-cultural perspective, with a number of readings focusing on Paris in particular. Students will undertake a Paris-based qualitative research project during the course of the semester.

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AR1010 Intro To Drawing

A studio course, which provides an introduction to basic drawing problems for the beginning student interested in developing his or her drawing skills. Subject matter includes still life, portraiture, landscape, and the nude. Mediums introduced are pencil, charcoal, and ink wash.Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

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BA2020 Management & Organizational Behavior

Introduces various aspects of the process by which people work to achieve organizational goals, and the structure and functions of the organization in which they occur. Using lectures, discussions, and case studies, the course focuses on the problems and challenges facing international management in the fields of planning, controlling, and organizing resources, time, and personnel.

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CL1025 The World, The Text, & The Critic I

Considers closely three moments when the practice of writing changed radically in response to historical and cultural processes, from Ancient Greece to 1800 (specific contents change each year). Investigates the forces that inform creative imagination and cultural production. Places those moments and those forces within a geographical and historical map of literary production, and introduces the tools of literary analysis.

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CL2006 Contemporary Feminist Theory

Introduces the methodology of Gender Studies and the theory upon which it is based. Examines contemporary debates across a range of issues now felt to be of world-wide feminist interest: sexuality, reproduction, production, writing, representation, culture, race, and politics. Encourages responsible theorizing across disciplines and cultures.

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CL2010 Paris Through Its Books

Examines how experiences of Paris have been committed to the page from the first century to the present. Considers the uses and effects of overviews, street-level accounts, and underground approaches to describing the city and its inhabitants. Includes visits to the sewers and museums, revolutionary sites and archives, with multiple members of the comparative literature faculty speaking on their areas of expertise. http://www.aup.edu/paris-through-its-books

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CM2006 Media Globalization

What is globalization? Why study the media? What is the relationship between the media and globalization? What are the consequences of media globalization on our lives and identities? This course critically explores these questions and challenging issues that confront us today. Globalization can be understood as a multi-dimensional, complex process of profound transformations in all spheres – technological, economic, political, social, cultural, intimate and personal. Yet much of the current debates of globalization tend to be concerned with “out there” macro-processes, rather than what is happening “in here,” in the micro-processes of our lives. This course explores both the macro and the micro. It encourages students to develop an enlarged way of thinking – challenging existing paradigms and providing comparative perspectives.

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CM3004 Communicating Fashion

Explores what happens when dress and grooming become the basis for the modern phenomena of fashion. Studies the historical development of fashion: how fashion relates to the emergence of artistic, social, and economic forms and the ways fashion communicates ideas about status, gender, or culture. Investigates the role of media, advertising and marketing in the global fashion industry.

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CS1040 Intro To Computer Programming I

Introduces the field of computer science and the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented perspective using the programming language Java. Starts with practical problem-solving and leads to the study and analysis of simple algorithms, data types, control structures, and use of simple data structures such as arrays and strings.

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CS2020 Computer Games Design

This project-based course provides an in-depth understanding of how the computer game design process works. Students with little or no programming experience will learn how to create their own computer games using either "drag-and-drop" game engines to create 2Dimensional and 3Dimensional games without any programming or computer programming for wireless devices (cell phones), using a subset of Java programming language J2ME, with examples from the game development process.

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CS2021 Social Robotics

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of simulation of complex systems (from collections of a few objects to multi-agent systems and societies in general), computation, and information processing, via a hands-on, active learning approach. By building physical artificial agents and using ready-made simulation programs, students will also learn about modeling complex phenomena along with experiment design and reporting. These skills are essential for any discipline.

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CS3068 Database Applications

Introduces databases from the programmer's perspective. IT and CS students have common lectures but different projects. IT students learn the fundamentals of database design, SQL, and how to integrate a database into applications. CS students learn the fundamentals of database design, application integration, query motors, and space management.

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EC2010 Principles Of Microeconomics

Focuses on the role played by relative market prices in our society and on the forces of market supply and demand in determining these prices. Since the actions of consumers and firms underlie supply and demand, the course studies in detail the behavior of these two groups.

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EC2020 Principles Of Macroeconomics

Examines the determinants of the levels of national income, employment, rates of interest, and prices. Studies in detail the instruments of monetary and fiscal policy, highlighting the domestic and international repercussions of their implementation.

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EC2010 Principles Of Microeconomics

Focuses on the role played by relative market prices in our society and on the forces of market supply and demand in determining these prices. Since the actions of consumers and firms underlie supply and demand, the course studies in detail the behavior of these two groups.

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ES3061 Anthropology Of Cities

Presents an anthropological approach to the study of cities, providing students with theoretical and methodological tools to think critically about the meaning of urban life today. Approaches this topic from a cross-cultural perspective, with a number of readings focusing on Paris in particular. Students will undertake a Paris-based qualitative research project during the course of the semester.

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FM2075 Intro To History Of Narrative Film I

Studies film history, aesthetics, and techniques of film analysis. Illustrates the basic theories of film-making with specific films of important directors such as Griffith, Eisenstein, Stroheim, Chaplin, Keaton, Murnau, Sternberg, Lubitsch, Renoir, Hawks, Ford, Welles, and Sturges.

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FM2076 Intro To History Of Narrative Film II

Analyzes classical Hollywood style from the 1940s onwards, looking at the work of some of the masters of the American system including Welles, Wyler, and Hitchcock. Studies postwar Hollywood genres including: film noir, the musical, the comedy, the Western, the gangster film, and sci-fi films. Traces important directions of postwar European Art Cinema (in particular Italian Neo-Realism and the Italian and French New Waves) and offers a brief overview of ‘new' cinemas worldwide. Explores the important developments that have taken place in Hollywood from the 1960s through to the present covering topics such as: New Hollywood cinema, the auteur renaissance of the seventies and eighties, neo-noir in the nineties, the digital age, and contemporary cinema.

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FR2060 Intro To Linguistics / À La Linguistique

A bilingual survey of linguistics conducted in French and English. Combines theory and practice to introduce students to the basic concepts in phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Focuses on the study of the human language as a system, the forms and functions of words and sentence elements, the creativity inherent in language systems, and language varieties. Prepares students to further investigate areas such as Historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language pathologies and first/second language acquisition.

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GS2006 Contemporary Feminist Theory

Introduces the methodology of Gender Studies and the theory upon which it is based. Examines contemporary debates across a range of issues now felt to be of world-wide feminist interest: sexuality, reproduction, production, writing, representation, culture, race, and politics. Encourages responsible theorizing across disciplines and cultures.

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GS2010 Psychology & Gender

Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes, biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.

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GS2016 Gender And Sexuality: Global Perspectives

Interrogates the concepts of ‘gender’ and ‘sexuality’ from a comparative, global perspective, drawing from multiple disciplines such as anthropology, ethnography, philosophy, sociology and history. Engages with questions of inequality, social justice and diversity as they are mapped onto gender and played out in institutional, political and socio-cultural power relations.

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GS3004 Communicating Fashion

Explores what happens when dress and grooming become the basis for the modern phenomena of fashion. Studies the historical development of fashion: how fashion relates to the emergence of artistic, social, and economic forms and the ways fashion communicates ideas about status, gender, or culture. Investigates the role of media, advertising and marketing in the global fashion industry.

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GS3014 Art, Cult., & Gender In Ital. Renaissance

Gender in the Italian Renaissance Examines the art and culture of the Italian Renaissance from the ever-expanding modern perspectives of Gay and Women's studies. Studies the art of Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo and lesser-known artists, as well as Castiglione's Book of the Courtier, within the broad context of early modern history and in relation to contemporaneous sexual practices and gender roles. Includes Louvre visits.

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HI1002 History Of Western Civ. From 1500

Continues History 1001, from the Renaissance and the Reformation through commercialism, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the industrial and social revolutions of the 19th century to nationalism and socialism in the contemporary Western world.

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HI1003 The Contemporary World

Beginning with the bipolar world of the Cold War, focuses on ideological struggles of the West, East, and Third World and the reactions of nations to the politics of the superpowers. Topics range from decolonization to the rise of the new Asia, African independence, the reemergence of the Muslim world, the collapse of communism, globalization and clash of world cultures.

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HI1005 World History Up To 1500

This seminar surveys basic themes in world history from the origins of humanity until about the year 1500 AD. Major themes include the rise of civilizations in Mesopotamia, India, East Asia, Central Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas, the role of technological change as a motor of historical development, the role of imperial states in the ancient world, the development of major world religions, the establishment of trade routes and other forms of contact between the main civilizations.

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HI1013 The City In World History

We have reached a critical moment in the evolution of cities. From Ur and Rome to Shanghai and the shadow cities of the 21st century, this radical shift in the way humans inhabit the planet marks a watershed moment in the history of world. This course will offer a historical perspective on this global transformation through an interdisciplinary study of city development from the ancient world to present. Students will be introduced to dominant themes of global and urban history by reading the historians, urban planners and social scientists who have traced the evolution of the built environment in context from its origins to today.

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HI1091 Topics In History

Topics vary each semester.

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HI2010 Early Islamic History

This course offers an introduction to the first century and a half of Islamic society, 600-700 AD. It builds on knowledge of ways of writing about the past which students have acquired in earlier courses. The focus of the course is the rise and development of the religion of Islam and the key events and figures in the process. They will read extracts by those who wrote history in the early Islamic centuries – and those who have approached early Islam and is history in the global North, notably since he nineteenth century. Essentially, the course offers: - Substantive detail about the rise of the last of the Abrahamic monotheism; - Theoretical reflection on the interplay between mediated communication, history and organized religion; - An exploration of the history writing practices of early Muslims; - An introduction of the intellectual history of nineteenth and twentieth century historiographies of the early Islamic Middle East and North Africa; - An introduction to pilgrimage practices in Islam.

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HI2020 The Historical Foundations Of Law

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical foundations of legal thought and to cultivate literacy in legal reasoning. The course provides an essential resource for our future global citizens by exploring key legal texts, histories and cases and familiarizing students with the historical origins of key contemporary legal issues.

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HI2030 Intro. To History, Law & Society

What role does law play in shaping society? How have courts shaped society, both domestically and internationally? What strategies have people taken to resist unjust laws? Students engage in weekly moot courts that survey gripping historical and contemporary cases, including fugitive slave laws, the death penalty and criminal justice, hate speech, transgender rights, and issues relating to immigration, including asylum and deportation. Readings come from history, literature, sociology, and legal opinions. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply critical approaches to the law to contemporary issues; perform a mock trial, from start to finish; and write persuasive and analytically rigorous papers that demonstrate interdisciplinary thinking. This course fulfills the GE 110 requirement.

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IDISC1091 Interdisciplinary Topics

Topics vary every semester.

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LI1000 Language Acq And Soc Policy

LI1000 Language Acq And Soc Policy

LW2020 The Historical Foundations Of Law

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical foundations of legal thought and to cultivate literacy in legal reasoning. The course provides an essential resource for our future global citizens by exploring key legal texts, histories and cases and familiarizing students with the historical origins of key contemporary legal issues.

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LW2030 Intro. To History, Law & Society

What role does law play in shaping society? How have courts shaped society, both domestically and internationally? What strategies have people taken to resist unjust laws? Students engage in weekly moot courts that survey gripping historical and contemporary cases, including fugitive slave laws, the death penalty and criminal justice, hate speech, transgender rights, and issues relating to immigration, including asylum and deportation. Readings come from history, literature, sociology, and legal opinions. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply critical approaches to the law to contemporary issues; perform a mock trial, from start to finish; and write persuasive and analytically rigorous papers that demonstrate interdisciplinary thinking. This course fulfills the GE 110 requirement.

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PL2003 Political Philosophy

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

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PL2071 Critique Of Political Economy

The course focuses on the impact of the emergent discipline of political economy on modern philosophy. A brief overview of the work of Adam Smith and David Ricardo will introduce the concerns of political economy before the course focuses on Karl Marx's attempt to re-orientate philosophy through the critique of political economy.

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PL2072 Freud & Nietzsche

An introduction to one of the key orientations of modern philosophy: critical genealogy and its central problematic, the identity and formation of the subject. The aim of critical genealogy is to unearth the hidden and unsuspected mechanisms, whether institutional or familial, which lie behind the formation of individual and social identities.

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PL3007 Concepts In Relativity And Quantum Theories

The nature of reality changed in fundamental ways in the early part of the 20th century. Concepts of duration, length, sequential order, simultaneity, weight, energy, location, mass, substance and void became a matter of perspective or ‘reference frame’. Scientists had been trying to explain apparently ‘absurd’ results, such as Maxwell’s EM wave equations or the photovoltaic effect, within the framework of classical physics. Much like what Ptolemy did with Aristotle’s model of the dynamics of the heavens before Copernicus and Kepler got it right, or, at least, not so wrong. In this course, I will present the basic principles, and derive the implications, of the theory of Special Relativity, I will describe the concepts and equivalences underlying the theory of General Relativity and show you why we know them to be correct (or at least not very wrong), I will introduce quantum theory and the quantum model of the atom and explain why it is better than plum pudding (see J. J. Thomson’s 1904 “plum pudding” model for the atom). In this course, you will learn about time travel, e=mc², black holes and wormholes. Is it true that if you run straight towards a cement wall it is just possible that you will make it through to the other side unharmed? Yes.

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PO1011 Foundations Of Modern Politics

What is politics - the quest for the common good or who gets what, when, and how? We study what defines politics in the modern age: states and nations in the international system, collective action and representation in mass societies, trajectories of democracy and dictatorship, politics and development in the context of capitalism. The course will introduce the student to the concerns, the language and the methods of Political Science.

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PO1091 Topics In Politics

PO2003 Political Philosophy

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

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PO2012 Intro To Polit'l Geography & Geopolitics

This course investigates how political processes shape human geography and, conversely, how assumptions about places underpin world politics. It presents the main theories of political geography, as well as essential concepts and terminology. It points to the historical contingency of political identities and organizations and reveals how major world events as well as spaces are shaped by everyday politics.

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PY1000 Intro To Psychology

This course discusses the intellectual foundations of contemporary psychology. Students learn about the concepts, theories and experiments basic to an understanding of the discipline, including classic thought and recent advances in psychology such as psychoanalysis, learning theory,biological mechanisms, developmental, social, cognitive, personality and abnormal psychology.

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PY2010 Psychology & Gender

Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes, biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.

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PY2021 Psychoanalytic Theories Of Personality

Centers on the development of Freud's metapsychology. Critically examines the different formulations of the following concepts: the unconscious, the structural approach (i.e., Ego, Id, Super Ego), representation, anxiety, drive, cathexis, and the mother-infant relationship. Jung's revisions of basic analytic concepts will be examined.

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PY2046 Cultural Psychology

Human beings are cultural beings. We cannot understand human nature without understanding its cultural fabric. We cannot understand ourselves and our being in the world without understanding this world as a cultural world, in fact, as consisting of multiple cultural worlds in which we live at the same time. In this course, we inquire why the cultural dimension is crucial for human psychology. To this purpose, we explore a number of cultural worlds, Western and non-Western. We also investigate various psychological functions such as thinking and consciousness, remembering and memory, and self-construction and identity. And we look at different cultural sign and symbol systems such as language, art, literature, and film. In this way, the course also offers the opportunity to think about our own cultural existence and the way we view ourselves and others.

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PY3067 Social Memory

This course inquires into the nature and dynamics of how groups (families, institutions, countries, etc.) reconstruct and represent the past together. The problem of social memory is approached from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to explore various places of memory in Paris and examine how these historical events are constructed in the present.

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PY3068 The Autobiographical Process

This course explores autobiographical remembering as an issue of neuroscientific, cultural, and narrative psychology, while also considering it as a subject of other memory studies. It draws particular attention to how scientific, psychological, social, technological, artistic, and conceptual changes in various cultural fields have transformed the traditional idea of memory as an archive of the past.

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VC3014 Art, Cult., & Gender In Ital. Renaissance

Gender in the Italian Renaissance Examines the art and culture of the Italian Renaissance from the ever-expanding modern perspectives of Gay and Women's studies. Studies the art of Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo and lesser-known artists, as well as Castiglione's Book of the Courtier, within the broad context of early modern history and in relation to contemporaneous sexual practices and gender roles. Includes Louvre visits.

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