MSc in International Management, Sustainability Systems Track

The MSc in International Management, Sustainability Systems Track reflects the need for future managers and leaders to understand the complex interplay of political, economic, environmental and social systems as they strive to build and manage the organization of the future. This focus area offers specialized coursework on sustainable development theory and practices informed by critical approaches, complexity theory and change management. Moreover, you will focus on research and literacy skills to better understand and cooperate with different functional areas essential for meaningful sustainable management practices, such as engineering and science and information technology.

Pursuing an MSc in International Management and Sustainability Systems has helped enrich my analytical skills while considering new critical and creative approaches to the social challenges facing today’s global enterprises.

Hope Stewart '16

Understanding contemporary management in a sustainable development context

Alongside the core modules of the International Management course, students taking the Sustainability Systems Track will choose from additional electives on topics including:

BA3012 Business Ethics & Corporate Soc. Resp.

This course explores the ethical issues that arise from the operation of business in a globalized and inter-connected economy. By applying the tools of theory, ethical analysis and personal reflection to a variety of real-life case studies, students will explore several disciplines of management practice, including marketing, operations, strategy, organizational behaviour, finance and accounting. Topical areas will be explored from multiple perspectives, including human rights, political involvement by business, sweatshop labour, the export of hazardous products, deceptive marketing practices, bribery, whistleblowing, religious/social discrimination, corporate governance, cross-cultural differences, sustainability and environmental issues, corporate social responsibility, and consumer society. The format of the course will be a series of interactive seminars and student participation is required. By the end of the course, students should have developed an organised, personally reflective approach to decision-making that can offer guidance when confronting difficult ethical dilemmas in both business and personal life.

VIEW DETAILS >

CM5053 Development Communications

This course provides an introduction to ‘Development Communications’ and to the communication practices that promote development, material change and social justice. The course explores the historical development of the field and the fundamental theories and figures and disciplines- from international development to mass communications-that have defined it as a distinct area of communications study and practice. Through numerous case studies, students explore intercultural and interpersonal communication on local, regional, national and global levels and examine numerous examples of development communications campaigns and civic media focusing on issues of public health, education, women’s empowerment, fair trade, and environmental, economic and cultural sustainability.

VIEW DETAILS >

CM4063 Sustainable Development Practicum

How does communication work as local government bodies, civil-society actors and NGOs put together sustainable development initiatives? How can communication be made to work better? Cutting across disciplines, this practicum allows students to see individuals, groups and communities in collaboration (and sometimes conflict) in a South Asian context marked by the 2004 tsunami. Based in the international eco-community of Auroville (Tamil Nadu, south-east India), students will explore substantive areas including micro-credit, health care with special reference to HIV/Aids, socially responsible business and environmental management. On-site visits and team-work are central to the course, leading to the production of multi-media reports on the interface between communication, development and sustainability. This course has an extra course fee - to guage an estimated cost, the fee was approximately 1600 euros.

VIEW DETAILS >

LW5080 Women, Conflict Res., & Internat'l Law

This course will examine the existing international legal framework for the protection of women’s rights and contrast the law with the nearly universal perception that the world of women is a private sphere, one where laws made in the public realm have less weight, or are more difficult to implement due to lack of witnesses, or worse, community acceptance of certain types of gender-based violence. But activists are making progress across the globe in combating insufficient implementation of women’s rights. This course will explore their remarkably innovative strategies to achieve conflict resolution and the protection of women in challenging circumstances.

VIEW DETAILS >

PO5012 Civil Society: Internat'l & Comp. Persp.

“Civil society” is one of the more elusive entries in the social science lexicon, and not a few have argued that we could do well without it. In a critical but appreciative spirit, this seminar introduces to the various meanings and uses that have been attributed to, or made of, civil society across time and national contexts. A constant in its various meanings is the reference to an elementary capacity of social self-organization beyond states and markets. This has made civil society an attractive alternative to diminished states and unfettered markets in the era of globalization, interestingly for the political left and right alike.

VIEW DETAILS >

CM5026 Politics & Economics Of Global Media

This course examines the dynamics of the global media system. Students will gain a critical awareness of how international flows of information, entertainment and lifestyle values play a powerful role in shaping cultural and political realities. The concept of "soft power" is key in examining the influence of Western pop culture, whether as "imperialism" or as "globalization". The course examines soft power in various forms: Hollywood movies, television series, pop music, Disney cartoons, fast food such as Coca-Cola and McDonalds, and social media networks such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. The course also analyzes the influence of non-Anglo-American pop culture — from Turkish soap operas to Latin American "telenovelas".

VIEW DETAILS >

Explore the full Track Requirements

Experience the Track

Program Highlight

Sweden Trip

Students organized a trip to the Triple Bottom Line Investment conference

Jowita

Student Spotlight

This city and this program have allowed me to pursue a more entrepreneurial and creative path

Net Impact Project

Faculty/Student Collaboration

Future leaders came together to take on social and environmental challenges